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Currency:
Mexico's currency is the Mexican Peso. There are one hundred Mexican cents (centavos) to every peso. 1 US Dollar = roughly 19.43 Mexican Pesos
Electricity:
120 volts, the same as in the US and Canada EU residents will need a power converter for battery chargers, lap tops, etc.
Language:
Spanish
Time Zone
Mexico is divided into 4 Standard Time zones: General: GMT-6, Baja California: GMT-8, Baja California Sur, Chihuahua, Nayarit & Sinaloa: GMT-7, Sonora: GMT-7.
Country Information

Mexico is at the southern extremity of North America and is bordered to the north by the USA, northwest by the Gulf of California, west by the Pacific, south by Guatemala and Belize, and east by the Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean. Mexico’s geographical features range from swamp to desert, and from tropical lowland jungle to high alpine vegetation. Over half the country is at an altitude greater than 1,000m (3,300ft).

The central land mass is a plateau flanked by ranges of mountains to the east and west that lie roughly parallel to the coast. The northern area of this plateau is arid and thinly populated, and occupies 40% of the total area of Mexico.

The southern area is crossed by a range of volcanic mountains running from Cape Corrientes in the west through the Valley of Mexico to Veracruz in the east, and includes the magnificent volcanoes of Cofre de Perote, Ixtaccahuatl, Matlalcueyetl, Nevado de Toluca, Orizaba and Popocatepetl. This is the heart of Mexico and where almost half of the population lives.

To the south, the land falls away to the sparsely populated Isthmus of Tehuantepec whose slopes and flatlands support both commercial and subsistence agriculture. In the east, the Gulf Coast and the Yucatan peninsula are flat and receive over 75% of Mexico’s rain. The most productive agricultural region in Mexico is the northwest, while the Gulf Coast produces most of Mexico’s oil and sulphur.

Along the northwest coast, opposite the peninsula of Baja California, and to the southeast along the coast of Bahia de Campeche and the Yucatan peninsula, the lowlands are swampy with coastal lagoons. Average temperatures along the coasts range between 25 C to 30 C (77 F to 86 F). The hottest time of the year runs from May to September (especially on the coasts), and it gets cooler from October to April.

While many nations live to work, Mexico does the opposite. The people are vivacious lovers of free time and socializing and the mentality is such that work will never dominate life the way it can for many other countries.

The country’s past seems to live at one with its present. As for the capital, Mexico City, more than 20 million people (a fifth of the whole population) live in this crazy cauldron of humanity. The Plaza de las Tres Culturas, Mexico City, celebrates the three major cultures that have shaped Mexico: there are Aztec ruins, the 17th-century colonial church of San Diego and several late 20th-century buildings. This is a country rich in history and steeped in tradition.

Our main area of interest from an angling perspective is the Yucatan Peninsula. Situated between the Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean Sea, the Yucatan Peninsula comprises the Mexican states of Yucatan, Campeche and Quintana Roo. The Peninsula is a vast, flat limestone shelf with a thin layer of topsoil.

There are few lakes and the rivers are mostly subterranean. The porous limestone of the area has created cenotes, which are the main source of water for the area. The Yucatan’s low elevation and tropical climate makes for hot and humid weather most of the year. This area is the spiritual homeland of the Maya, who built cities and ceremonial centers in ancient times, and still give the area a distinctive cultural feel. The Yucatec Maya language is still spoken, along with Spanish.

The Yucatan also holds the Sian Ka’an Biosphere, which is a spectacular 1.3 million acre park made up of tropical rainforest, mangroves, savannas, cenotes, coral reefs, and Mayan ruins. Our Yucatan fishing locations are situated inside this protected area, where no commercial fishing, other than lobstering is permitted.